The Face of Domestic Violence

Top-10 Domestic Violence Centers in the USA

January 20, 2019 5:55 pm Published by 2 Comments


Domestic violence can be defined as patterns of behavior in a relationship used to gain power and control over a partner. Abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, psychological, or some combination thereof. It can happen to anyone of any gender, race, age, sexual orientation, religion, profession, education, or socioeconomic background (though women are more likely than men to be victimized), and within couples who are married, living together, or dating.

We at the Paz Foundation have researched the top-10 most effective Anti-Violence centers and help organizations. From the list below one can conclude that Domestic Violence know ethnicity, age, gender, economic status or culture. We would like to thank the Directors of the Top-ten organizations for their work and dedication in helping thousands of victims overcome the stigma of being victimized and for the terrible pain they carry in their heart.

  1. American Bar Association Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence: The Commission seeks to address domestic and sexual violence from a legal perspective. Its mission is to increase access to justice for survivors of DV, sexual assault, and stalking by engaging the interest and support of members of the legal profession.
  2. Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence: The API Institute is a national resource center focused on gender-based violence (DV, sexual violence, and trafficking) in Asian and Pacific Islander communities. It addresses these issues by increasing awareness, strengthening community strategies for prevention and intervention, and promoting research and policy.
  3. Battered Women’s Justice Project: BWJP offers DV-related training, technical assistance, and consultation to members of the criminal and civil justice systems. The Project analyzes and advocates for effective policing, prosecuting, sentencing, and monitoring of perpetrators of domestic violence.
  4. Child Welfare League of America: CWLA is comprised of a coalition of hundreds of private and public agencies serving at-risk children and families. The League works to advances policies and strategies that promote safe, stable families and assist children, youth, and adults whose families don’t meet those criteria.
  5. Equality Now: Working with grassroots organizations and activists, Equality Now seeks to protect and promote the human rights of women and girls all over the world by documenting violence and discrimination against women and mobilizing efforts to stop these abuses.
  6. Futures Without Violence: FWV aims to advance the health, stability, education, and security of women, men, girls, and boys worldwide. To that end, the organization was a big player in developing the Violence Against Women Act (passed by Congress in 1994) and continues to work with policy makers and train professionals (doctors, nurses, athletic coaches, and judges) to improve responses to DV and educate people about the importance of healthy relationships.
  7. INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence: INCITE! describes itself as a “national activist organization of radical feminists of color advancing a movement to end violence against women of color and our communities.” Comprised of grassroots chapters across the U.S., the organization works with groups of women of color and their communities to develop political projects that address the violence women of color may experience both within their communities and individual lives.
  8. Institute of Domestic Violence in the African American Community: Run out of the University of Minnesota, the Institute has several clearly defined objectives: to further scholarship in the area of African American violence; to provide outreach and technical assistance to African American communities experiencing violence; to raise awareness about the impacts of violence in African American communities; to influence public policy; and to organize violence-related trainings on local and national scales.
  9. Jewish Women International: JWI seeks to empower women and girls through economic literacy, community trainings, and education about healthy relationships. The organization aims to end violence against women by advocating for policies focused on violence prevention and reproductive rights, developing philanthropic initiatives along similar lines, and inspiring “the next generation of leaders” by recognizing and celebrating women’s achievements.
  10. Manavi: Manavi, which means “primal woman” in Sanskrit, is a women’s rights organization committed to ending violence and exploitation committed against South Asian women living in the U.S. The organization provides direct service to survivors of violence, grassroots organization aimed at changing communities, and awareness programs on local and national levels.
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